When searching for immediate, short-term shelter, look for trees (especially fallen trees), rocky overhangs, and caves. Trees are an obvious source of shelter and have many useful parts for building shelter including the trunk – which can be used as a support, the branches – which can be used as framework, and foliage – which can be used as insulating material.
Imagine for a minute that you work downtown in a large city, maybe you ride the subway or take a bus to work everyday. You are in a large office building with many floors, thousands of people, and you are on the fifteen or twentieth story. If a disaster strikes how are you going to get out? I mean literally. If there is an earthquake, or a catastrophic man made event how are you going to get out of your building? How are you going to get down the street? How are you going to get home? Do you want to be one of the people covered in dust wandering around in shock? I sure don’t.
This is fantastic!! I got it for a friends zombie bug out bag Christmas gift and now I want to keep it for myself. The writing is witty and funny all while providing great practical information. Then illustrations are done very well and are easy to follow. I love how the lay out starts are the beginning when food and supply are plentiful and ends with survival for the "long haul".
I am only about halfway through the book and have learned several things that, while I have lived in the country all my life and know about food preservation and storage, some basic first-aid, surviving in different weather conditions (in my area), etc., have really increased my awareness of what I need to have in a grab-and-go bag . . . Thanks, Bob, for this book.
For stand alone teepees, start with three long straight poles and use a tripod lashing to join them. Try to locate a long pole with a Y-shaped joint at one end. This will provide the frame with stability as the next pole can rest within the Y-shape. To build the teepee, continually add pairs of similar sized poles and join them together at the top, leaving the base wide enough to curl up in and tall enough to sit comfortably.

If you even hope to get to the point of surviving to “after” you’re Apocalypse, then you are going to need to have a place to ride out the disaster. This will probably be the most difficult of surfing the Apocalypse, because as many people are finding out in these economic hard times, it may mean moving out of that fancy house, into a smaller, more affordable place.

Don't worry about those questions. Instead take action and educate yourself on survival techniques. Nature is unforgiving and you must be prepared to fight to stay alive. The contents of this website are taken from actual US Army training manuals, this is the same material used to train the best army in the world. You will not find a more complete resource on Wilderness Survival. So prepare yourself because one day you may need it.
Great and entertaining book , it reminds me of shows like the walking dead, if in reality there was ever to be a zombie apocalypse , which I assume there wont , this would definitely be the guide, the author stopped at nothing to deliver how to go about surviving, I also believe that the points noted in this book can also be used for when there is a disaster. Great and entertaining read!
In terms of the wilderness itself, avoid any foliage that has a chalky white appearance as this is a mold that could spread through your shelter and impact your health. Also, if a tree contains a lot of ‘lacey’ leaves, that indicates it is probably infested with insects and best to be avoided.
As I wrap up this wilderness survival guide, consider this. While I began my journey learning wilderness survival out of a deep, and what I now understand as an archetypal, need to be in direct relationship with my most basic needs as a human being, the learning journey itself brought many more gifts. It actually changed the way I perceived the world, bringing me to a newfound level of health and vitality, and ultimately bringing me into full connection with my passion, my power, and my purpose in life.

Now that you have the basic skills necessary to plan and build your shelter, the next step is to get outside and get practicing! While techniques such as weaving and lashing can be practiced in your backyard, when it comes to building an effective survival shelter, there’s no substitute for the real deal. As you’re practicing, make sure to take note of pertinent factors such how long it takes you to gather materials and construct your shelter – knowing this timing can be life-saving in a real disaster scenario.

“If we look at examples of systematic social breakdowns, like Argentina in 2001, or the war in the Balkans, goods that people understood on an intrinsic level clearly carried the most value when trading — cans of food, gas, batteries, cheap Bic lighters,” he said. “A good rule of thumb: If you’d find it useful in an emergency, you’ll be able to find someone who will trade for it in an emergency.”


For stand alone teepees, start with three long straight poles and use a tripod lashing to join them. Try to locate a long pole with a Y-shaped joint at one end. This will provide the frame with stability as the next pole can rest within the Y-shape. To build the teepee, continually add pairs of similar sized poles and join them together at the top, leaving the base wide enough to curl up in and tall enough to sit comfortably.

But if you are among the swelling class of weekend paranoiacs of affluent means who are starting to mull fantasies of urban escape following the endless headlines about disasters, both natural and manufactured, you may be starting to see a different image in your mind when think “survivalist.” You may no longer see the wild-eyed cave dweller in camouflage fatigues, hoarding canned goods. You may even see one in the mirror.
So, where do I start? I am not a prepper. Actually, I did not even know what a prepper was until I read this book. So, you are probably wondering why I even bought it. Well, I'm getting to that point in life where I am thinking of retirement in the next ten years. I would like to find some property out of the city...away from everything. Just tired of traffic, tired of barking dogs, tired of hit and runs, tired of loud music - you get it. With living on a large plot of land, I have been keeping in mind that I need to have some things to be prepared. I'm looking at moving to Montana, and, with the thought of being snowed in a for a while, I wanted to make sure that I was prepared.
So, where do I start? I am not a prepper. Actually, I did not even know what a prepper was until I read this book. So, you are probably wondering why I even bought it. Well, I'm getting to that point in life where I am thinking of retirement in the next ten years. I would like to find some property out of the city...away from everything. Just tired of traffic, tired of barking dogs, tired of hit and runs, tired of loud music - you get it. With living on a large plot of land, I have been keeping in mind that I need to have some things to be prepared. I'm looking at moving to Montana, and, with the thought of being snowed in a for a while, I wanted to make sure that I was prepared.
If you even hope to get to the point of surviving to “after” you’re Apocalypse, then you are going to need to have a place to ride out the disaster. This will probably be the most difficult of surfing the Apocalypse, because as many people are finding out in these economic hard times, it may mean moving out of that fancy house, into a smaller, more affordable place.

Preperably a real snow cave, a quinzhee or a slope cave would be chosen, but those shelters are time consuming and requires some experience to do right, and in som areas like in the forest, it can be impossible due to snow depth, or to find a bank with enough drifted snow. Shelters like that are more useful above the tree-line were there are more snow and less vegitation.
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