This is the beginning of the new series called "Apocalypse Tips #6 - Urban Survival". It focuses on Gear we should acquire and things we should learn, Research and study to prepare as best we can for the initial phases of starting to Prep and train for survival in any situation. This series will introduce and elaborate on many skills, abilities, planning and gear that will not only aid in survival in an apocalyptic scenario but also in everyday life and other survival situations.

Video shot with Nikon and Cannon equipment. Audio prepared by Samson Audio devices. Thans to Adobe CC, After Effects, Premiere Pro. Video footage and audio clips provided by Audioblocks, VideoBlocks, Adobe Stock, Bigstock, Freemovies, Google Images and thrid party assets. All rights reserved by original owners and rights and permissions granted through proper copyright purchases and rights guarantees.

Video shot with Nikon and Cannon equipment. Audio prepared by Samson Audio devices. Thans to Adobe CC, After Effects, Premiere Pro. Video footage and audio clips provided by Audioblocks, VideoBlocks, Adobe Stock, Bigstock, Freemovies, Google Images and thrid party assets. All rights reserved by original owners and rights and permissions granted through proper copyright purchases and rights guarantees.


Taking a step back may not be a good look on the surface, but Anmuth believes that rationality is finally starting to make itself known in this niche. Both Uber and Lyft appear to be scaling back on their discounting promotions and shifting their marketing efforts to loyalty products and subscription plans that will keep customers close. An industry that lost billions last year could be profitable on an adjusted basis as soon as next year with Uber leading the way.
As a wilderness survival guide, I often am called upon to differentiate wilderness survival from primitive living. Often times these two are lumped together as one, but in fact they are distinct. Wilderness survival refers to the actual experience of survival in the wilderness, which may or may not be a "primitive" experience depending on the gear you have access to. Wilderness survival is usually a short term experience. Primitive Living is usually a long term experience, and refers to the experience of living in a primitive setting, practicing primitive skills for an extended period of time.
Find a way to generate your own electricity. Taking car batteries and daisy chaining them will act as an energy storage device, but you're going to need to generate power. A generator running on wood, gas or a diesel engine where you can make your own fuel is good, but the real payoff is using renewable energy by making your own wind turbine out of PVC pipes and a car alternator or scavenging some solar panels near a highway. When the events do take a turn for the worst, at least you'll be able to be productive at night and have some of the luxuries of your former life.[8]
Gather approximately five to six poles to lean against the ridgepole at roughly a 45-60 degree angle, enough to create a comfortable space to fit your team and gear underneath. This will serve as your grid. To create the grid frame, attach 5 to 6 poles across the frame. Weave flexible boughs between poles at right angles and then use bark or leafy branches to thatch the roof, starting from the bottom and moving upwards.
Black Rock City is built in Nevada’s beautiful, remote and inhospitable Black Rock Desert. Burning Man is not a festival. It is an event, a community, and a global cultural movement. In Black Rock City you are responsible for your own survival, safety, and well-being. You are invited to collaborate, be inclusive, creative, connective, and to Leave No Trace.
So what is a defenseless, law-abiding survivalist to do? Prepper bibles like “100 Deadly Skills,” by Clint Emerson, a former Navy SEAL, are filled with improvised alternative weapons, like a collapsible umbrella lined with wrenches, which is “not illegal to possess,” a New York City Police Department spokesman said, but “would be considered a weapon if you used it on someone.”
Find other survivors. You've got your food, you've got your weapons, and you've staked out a place to stay. Now it's time to assemble a team a la The Walking Dead. Except that you want a team that is actually useful. When you consider taking on others (they're mouths to feed, after all), assess what they can do for you. Do they know plants? Are they a wizard with a javelin? Are they carrying their own stockpile of food?

I am only about halfway through the book and have learned several things that, while I have lived in the country all my life and know about food preservation and storage, some basic first-aid, surviving in different weather conditions (in my area), etc., have really increased my awareness of what I need to have in a grab-and-go bag . . . Thanks, Bob, for this book.


With a calm center, over half the struggle is over. As I mentioned earlier, the most common physical reason that people die in wilderness survival situations is exposure to the elements. A person can die from exposure in as little as three hours. You must learn how to stay warm when it is cold, how to stay cool when it is hot, and how to stay dry when it is wet. Enter the wilderness survival shelter. It can take many forms, with a classic one being the debris hut. The debris hut is a small, one person shelter that is basically a simple structure that cocoons a person in leaves, grasses, boughs, or other natural debris to keep them insulated. It is built to shed water. Just imagine a primitive tent and sleeping bag all in one.
Preperably a real snow cave, a quinzhee or a slope cave would be chosen, but those shelters are time consuming and requires some experience to do right, and in som areas like in the forest, it can be impossible due to snow depth, or to find a bank with enough drifted snow. Shelters like that are more useful above the tree-line were there are more snow and less vegitation.
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