This is the beginning of the new series called "Apocalypse Tips #6 - Urban Survival". It focuses on Gear we should acquire and things we should learn, Research and study to prepare as best we can for the initial phases of starting to Prep and train for survival in any situation. This series will introduce and elaborate on many skills, abilities, planning and gear that will not only aid in survival in an apocalyptic scenario but also in everyday life and other survival situations.
The SOS Parachute (about $2,400) is compact enough to store in a cubicle, opens in about two seconds and is designed to work for the 11th floor and higher. Granted, the parachute is exactly not 82nd Airborne-grade, and a 200-pound man might find the landing a little rough. “You may twist an ankle,” said Nicolas Havett, a company executive. But in a situation serious enough to warrant a parachute, that’s a deal that many would take.

Lets back up a minute. Pretend you just got home again, but this time you surveyed the situation and decided that you are not in immediate danger but are still not at situation normal. Now what do you do? A Bug In Plan is for emergency situations where you can stay in your own home but have to rely on your own preparations to survive. This might just mean that you will be without power or water for an extended period. Maybe it means you actually can’t leave your home at all for whatever reason.
As a wilderness survival guide, I often am called upon to differentiate wilderness survival from primitive living. Often times these two are lumped together as one, but in fact they are distinct. Wilderness survival refers to the actual experience of survival in the wilderness, which may or may not be a "primitive" experience depending on the gear you have access to. Wilderness survival is usually a short term experience. Primitive Living is usually a long term experience, and refers to the experience of living in a primitive setting, practicing primitive skills for an extended period of time.
Most everyone loves fire. Fire is essential in a wilderness survival situation for a few reasons. One, it provides warmth which keeps body temperature up. Two, it provides heat used to purify water. It also provides light, heat to cook food, and serves as a center to draw people in. Earth based wisdom teaches us that fire is a spirit unto itself, and encourages us to have a good relationship with fire. I know that despite my passion for it, I didn't truly appreciate fire until it took me four days to get it with a fully primitive bow and drill fire making kit on my first wilderness survival solo.

Great and entertaining book , it reminds me of shows like the walking dead, if in reality there was ever to be a zombie apocalypse , which I assume there wont , this would definitely be the guide, the author stopped at nothing to deliver how to go about surviving, I also believe that the points noted in this book can also be used for when there is a disaster. Great and entertaining read!


Preperably a real snow cave, a quinzhee or a slope cave would be chosen, but those shelters are time consuming and requires some experience to do right, and in som areas like in the forest, it can be impossible due to snow depth, or to find a bank with enough drifted snow. Shelters like that are more useful above the tree-line were there are more snow and less vegitation.
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