If you even hope to get to the point of surviving to “after” you’re Apocalypse, then you are going to need to have a place to ride out the disaster. This will probably be the most difficult of surfing the Apocalypse, because as many people are finding out in these economic hard times, it may mean moving out of that fancy house, into a smaller, more affordable place.
As a wilderness survival guide, I often am called upon to differentiate wilderness survival from primitive living. Often times these two are lumped together as one, but in fact they are distinct. Wilderness survival refers to the actual experience of survival in the wilderness, which may or may not be a "primitive" experience depending on the gear you have access to. Wilderness survival is usually a short term experience. Primitive Living is usually a long term experience, and refers to the experience of living in a primitive setting, practicing primitive skills for an extended period of time.
I keep looking back at this and time and time again, I find myself getting lost in the vastness of what it covers. Sure, there's specialized survival manuals out there, but this one is takes the cake for what all it covers. The illustrations (black and white) are really helpful and useful. I got this for the handy man/survival expert of the house, but find myself lost in it's detail often. Take note of the size. It's big, definitely a coffee table book sized item. But it's paperback, so relatively light. Not something you'd take on the AT. Makes me want to make my own cheese or practice the art of canning seasonal veggies.
If it’s the middle of winter and all available building supplies are frozen or buried under snow, remember that snow will have the same insulating effect as a stick-built shelter. For more cold weather survival tips, CLICK HERE. Additionally, always seek out shelter where the ground is dry. If it is raining, waterways may overflow their banks and ravines, and washes may form. 
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