So, where do I start? I am not a prepper. Actually, I did not even know what a prepper was until I read this book. So, you are probably wondering why I even bought it. Well, I'm getting to that point in life where I am thinking of retirement in the next ten years. I would like to find some property out of the city...away from everything. Just tired of traffic, tired of barking dogs, tired of hit and runs, tired of loud music - you get it. With living on a large plot of land, I have been keeping in mind that I need to have some things to be prepared. I'm looking at moving to Montana, and, with the thought of being snowed in a for a while, I wanted to make sure that I was prepared.
For the walls, look for trees that are seven to ten inches in diameter and cut them to fit the dimensions of your floor plan. To prepare the logs for the walls, flatten the top and bottom so that they sit flush and notch the ends to interlock them and form a sturdy corner – additionally, cutting a notch in the top log only will avoid pooling water in the joints while in wetter climates.

When searching for immediate, short-term shelter, look for trees (especially fallen trees), rocky overhangs, and caves. Trees are an obvious source of shelter and have many useful parts for building shelter including the trunk – which can be used as a support, the branches – which can be used as framework, and foliage – which can be used as insulating material.
×